Good Friday & Black Saturday

The Harrowing of HadesSome people call it Holy Saturday, I prefer Black Saturday. And for the record, one of my least favorite things that churches do these days is to have an Easter service on Saturday night. I get it, I get it. I know why you do it but that doesn't make it any better. As I was sitting in my churches Good Friday requiem (which might have been the most amazing music I have ever heard in a church building) I was reflecting on the weekend, I even wrote a few things down in my journal. By Friday night Jesus would have been crucified, dead and buried. His words, "it is finished" would have been said and his last breath would have been breathed. Personally I want to sit there, in the darkness. I want to take in the forsakenness of it all. I want t know that darkness, the quite, that stirring chaos. I want to sit in and become familiar with this space, to become aware of the void and the despair.

Most times we want to jump to Sunday, to resurrection. I hate even speaking the word today. It's still Saturday. Jesus is still dead. Doing his thing in hell while I sit in my own hell. I don't want to jump ahead I want to take in this fierce silence.

There are many time in my life and in my struggles where I wondering where God is. I wondering if he has abandoned me. I read the early parts of many of the Psalms and want to stop just before the poet gets to the "but I remember" or "but I will praise you" parts. I can relate to the nagging questions "why have you forsaken me" but in those moments I have a hard time with the remembrance and the praise parts.

You see, I want to sit in the dark silence of Good Friday evening & Black Saturday because it's here, as I remember this story, as I reenact this narrative that I experience true abandonment. Where with Jesus I can honestly cry out, "Why have you forsaken me."

I want to be so aware and attuned to this absence so that in all the other moments of life that feel so dry and dark I can sense God's presence even then. And I can sense it because I know what Black Saturday is like and in all of those other moments I will be able to say, "this isn't that."

 

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These thoughts are inspired by Ignatian meditation that encourages us to really live into the text and put ourselves, imaginatively into the stories. This type of thoughtful, imaginative scripture engagement had greatly deepened my life. Try it!