A Conversation Partner | Wesley & Student Ministry

A Conversation Partner | Wesley & Student Ministry (a book review)

A fellow I crossed paths with quite a few years ago recently contacted me about reviewing a book he wrote on student ministry and John Wesley. My first thoughts was... I like student ministry, I like John Wesley, and I really like free books! SURE! Now I guess I should confess that it wasn't all that recently. I'm a bit behind on writing this little ditty here. Sorry Jeremy! But the good news is... the book is available, go buy a few copies!!! Tell em' Erik sent you.

So here's the review...

To have a conversation partner who helps you think through how what you believe shapes what you do is an extremely value thing. Youth pastors often get pretty stuck in the rut of just making it happen; programs, events, small groups, mission trips, and a million other things. I speak as one such youth pastor. Often the why can get buried in dust kicked up by the doing. To have a few people that are continually calling you back to the why of ministry is really important. In this this book Jeremy is offering himself to fill a bit of that space for anyone who has been shaped by the beauty and truth of John Wesley’s theological contribution. (And to say practical theology is redundant but if you’re into Wesley much you already know that.

Bottom line, if you like Wesley and if you work with students you’ll like this book. So pick up a few copies and let Jeremy lead your student ministry staff and volunteers in a conversation about the real Wesleyan soul of student ministry!

That was my Amazon review, I would add that I especially enjoyed a couple of the grace sections. To talk about how prevenient grace and the means of grace can and should be a reminder that God is always and already at work, taking pressure off youth workers and rather inviting us to create spaces and places for that grace to be encountered. I love the vision and invitation we get from Wesley’s understanding of Grace and Jeremy helps us remember that we are simply participating in the grace that is always and already wooing and working on all of us.

I do think there were a couple chapters where he was stretching it a bit or maybe trying a little to hard. His contribution about John Wesley's class meetings and bands is good but not unique. I would love some more source material and resources around this.  But no doubt thinking about how Wesley structured his ministry is helpful for the church and specifically youth ministry. And the book ended strong as well. The missional nature of Wesley's theology, the constant impulse to be on the go alongside God's grace, to be living in a way that is for the world is strong and Jeremy does well at highlighting that this and challenging the youth worker to embrace this.

My cirque is minimal, this is a good book. At first read I was bit unsure of the title but I get it, I think. The soul is all about our desires and impulse, it's about what is deep, at the center of a person. The soul (and I would add the heart, if we were speaking in OT terms) is root of all our actions.  My soul often feels buried by my to-do list. This book and John Wesley are both great partners in caring for the soul as we participate in the mission of God for the sake of the world.

You can pick up the book here. And read more about the author, Jeremy Steele here. Or read his tweets. Or his blog.